Purbita Ditecha Reliable and Most Trusted Marketing Advertising Consultant

Purbita Ditecha Reliable and Most Trusted Marketing Advertising Consultant from Dooars, West Bengal,India with 6 years successful experience.

Alipurduar is the queen of Dooars Wildlife Santury

Alipurduar is a sub-divisional municipal town of Jalpaiguri district, and is located at the eastern end of the district. Situated on the east bank of Kaljani River on the foothills of the Himalayas, the town is a gateway to Bhutan and North Eastern states of India.

25+ IT skills can mange a job of $110000 plus salary per month

Being a tech (IT) professional is a good career with plenty of high-paying jobs. But it’s an ever-changing job market....

Changing Predicted SEO Trends Behind Algorithms

it is the need of your time and effort and energy and effort that you should understand each and every distinction that is going on in the Seo systems. One of the best and latest cases are the Panda and Penguin up-dates.

Evergreen 72 hot social media Marketing Facts strategies

Social media and inbound marketing techniques have been a boon for marketers. Not only do leads generated through social and content marketing cost half as much as traditional outbound-generated leads, they also close at higher rate

Sunday, 19 March 2017

Instant Professional service: Rewrite your Resume, Cover Letter and LinkedIn Profile

A cover letter is a single-page letter that should be part of any job application. The only time a cover letter should not be included is when a job ad clearly says to NOT include one. At all other times you should include a cover letter.



Topics on this page include:

> The purpose of a cover letter
> How long should a cover letter be?
> Customise your cover letter 
> What to include in your cover letter
> What NOT to include in your cover letter
> Cover letters when no job has been advertised
> Email cover letters
> When only a cover letter is requested
> Cover letter templates

Note: If you have no time to follow all the steps or out of range then you can ORDER ME to do so via this website or third party reliable website with Refund guarantee 

The purpose of a cover letter

You might be applying for a specific, advertised job, or you might be contacting a potential employer to see if they have any vacancies. Either way, your cover letter needs to: 

Introduce you

Mention the job (or kind of job) you're applying for (or looking for) 
Match your skills and experiences with the skills and experiences required by the job 
Encourage the reader to read your resume 
Finish with a call to action (e.g., requesting an interview or asking to meet)
For more about each of these steps, check out "What to include on your cover letter", below.

How long should a Cover letter be?

A cover letter shouldn't be more than one page. It's only meant to be a summary of the information you put in your resume, so remember to keep things short.
Customise your cover letter
You should never use the same cover letter for different job applications.

Your cover letter needs to show that you know what the job involves and what the organisation requires. To do this you need to be as specific as you can about your skills and qualities and how they match the job or organisation's needs.

Here are three simple ways to make your cover letter as specific as possible:

1. Find out who to address it to

Avoid addressing your letter "To Whom It May Concern" if you can. Finding out who to address your application to takes a little bit of effort, but it's worth it.

If you found the job in an ad, the ad will probably name a person to send the application to. If not, call the employer or recruitment agency (don't email them) and ask who to send the application to.

When addressing a letter, don't use the person's first name. Use either "Mr." or "Ms.".

2. Find out more about the job

When finding out who to address your application to, you should also try to speak to that person so you can ask questions that will help you tailor your cover letter (and resume).

Questions you might consider asking include: 

What can you tell me about the job?
What can you tell me about the ideal candidate for the job?
Is there a position description I can look at? (only ask this if the job ad didn't mention a position description)
The answers to these questions will give you an idea of what you should mention in your cover letter.

3. Find out more about the company

Finding out more about a company is also a good way to work out how to tailor your cover letter. Here's some tips: 

If you know the name of the company, look for information online
If they have their own website, check it out, especially their About Us page
If the company name isn't in the ad, call the recruitment agency and ask who the employer is

What to include in a cover letter
Here's a list of things that you should include when you write a cover letter. For examples of these things in action, check out our Sample resumes and cover letters page.

Your name and contact details
Put your name and contact details at the top of your cover letter. You don't have to give your postal address, but you do need to include your email and phone number.

Make sure you'll be able to answer the number you give - no sense giving your home phone if you're not going to be home to answer it.

Make sure your email address is a professional sounding one. An email address like purbita@purbitaditecha.com doesn't create the right impression.

Their name and contact details
Under your own name and contact details you should include: 

The name of the person you're writing to 
Their position or the name of their company 
Their contact details
If you're having trouble finding this information you can call the company to ask who you should address your application to.

You can also use "To Whom It May Concern" - but try to only use this as a last resort.

The name of the job you're going for
At the start of your cover letter explain which job you're applying for. You can either do this on a line by itself (e.g., "Re: Application for Stock Controller position") or in the opening paragraph (e.g., "I am writing to apply for the recently advertised Stock Controller position.")

For examples of how to do this, check out our Sample resumes and cover letters page.

A list of your relevant skills

Your letter should Include a brief summary of your skills and experiences that match the job description. A short bullet-pointed list is fine.

If you're answering a job ad, either the ad or the position description may provide a list of skills and experiences that are essential for doing the job. It may also provide a list of "desirable" skills and experience. Your cover letter needs to respond to all of the items on the "essential" list and as many items as possible on the "desirable" list in as short a way as possible.

Remember that if you say you have a skill or experience, you need to show how you've used it or how you got it (e.g., if you say you've got child-minding skills, mention some jobs where you've used them).

For examples of how to do this, check out the cover letter templates on our Sample resumes and cover letters page.

A summary of why you're right for the job

After listing your skills and experience you should explain why this means you're suited to the job (e.g., "The combination of my interest in AFL and my experience with book-keeping makes me ideally suited for this job.")

For examples of how to do this, check out the cover letter templates on our Sample resumes and cover letters page.

Speak their language
Using the same language as people who do a particular job is a good way to convince people you're suited to the job.

Getting familiar with what a company does and how it talks about itself can give you ideas about things to mention in your cover letter, and how to talk about them.

For example, if there's a tool or software or skill the job requires - like machining tools or cash handling - mention it in your cover letter (but make sure you mention it correctly!).

Check out the "Customise your cover letter" section on this page for tips on finding out more about a company.

Ask them to check out your resume & contact you
Your cover letter should finish by asking the reader to look at your resume. It should also ask them to contact you about an interview.

Try something simple like, "I have attached a copy of my resume for your consideration. I look forward to hearing from you about this application."

For more examples of ways to finish a cover letter, check out the cover letter templates on our Sample resumes and cover letters page

What NOT to include in a cover letter

Here is a list of things that you should NOT include in your cover letter:

Typos or factual errors

You should always spellcheck your cover letter. It's even better to get someone else to read it and point out any mistakes or confusing things. People you can ask include friends, family members, your careers teacher or a careers counsellor at your university or TAFE.

Double-check everything in your cover letter. If you mention a company's name, make sure you get it right. If you mention places you've worked before, make sure you get their names right too. Mistakes on cover letters are worse than typos.

Your entire resume

Don't cut and paste your resume into your cover letter. Try to re-word the information on your resume rather than just repeating it. Keep your cover letter short and let your resume tell the whole story.

Using "I" too much

Try to make sure that you don't fill your cover letter with things like "I believe", "I have" and "I am". Once you've written your letter, look over it and see if you can take out - or rewrite - any sentences that start with "I".

Don't mention your other job applications
You'll probably have more than one job application on the go at any one time. It's important, though, not to mention other job applications. You're trying to convince people you really want the job - it's hard to do that if they know you're looking for other jobs as well.

Even though most people assume you aren't only applying for one job at a time, it's best if you act as though you are.

Cover letters for when there's no job advertised
Sometimes you might want to work for a particular business or organisation even though there haven't been any specific jobs advertised. Contacting these businesses directly to ask if they have any jobs available is a perfectly legitimate thing to do. It can show a high level of motivation and enthusiasm, and could even lead to a job.

Even if there's no job currently available, there's a chance they could keep your details on file and get in touch with you when a job does become available.

This kind of cover letter should be written in the same way as a general cover letter, but with a few differences. You need to:

Show you've researched the organisation or business and know about what it does
Mention why you're interested in working for them (in terms of what they do and your own long-term goals)
Show how your skills, experience and interest fit in with the goals of the business or organisation
Indicate what you're hoping to get out of contacting them - do you want to know about positions currently available or to speak to someone about what it's like to work there?
Finish the letter by saying that you'll contact them in a couple of weeks, but that you're happy to talk to them if they want to contact you before that
If you haven't heard back in a couple of weeks, it's okay for you to contact them to ask for a response - try emailing them or calling them to discuss your letter directly.

For examples of this kind of cover letter, check out our Cold calling cover letter template. For more information about approaching organisations and businesses directly, check out our Cold calling - What is it? page.

Email cover letters

Sometimes you'll be asked to send your cover letter as an email instead of a separate document. If this is the case you should: 

Write your name and the job title in the email subject line (e.g., " Purbita Ditecha - Application for Administration Assistant role")
Remember you still need to use the name of the person you're writing to
Avoid formatting the body of the email like a traditional letter - leave out the contact details (yours and theirs) and just go straight to the "Dear XXXX" part.
End the email with a professional signature that includes your phone number
Always send the email from a professional looking email address
For more about this kind of cover letter, visit our Cover Letter: Email + no work experience or Cover Letter: Email + work experience pages (choose the page that matches your level of paid work experience).

What to do when only a cover letter is requested
Some organisations may specifically ask you to respond to requirements of the job in a one-page cover letter instead of submitting a resume.

When this happens it's important to link your experience to the job's requirements in your cover letter. When writing this kind of cover letter you should:

Include contact details (yours and theirs), a reference line and a brief introduction to yourself, as advised in "What to include in your cover letter", above

Briefly summarise your experience

Use bullet points (one bullet for each requirement of the job) to clearly outline a) each requirement and b) how you meet it (each point should be two lines maximum)

Conclude by asking them to contact you, as advised in "What to include in your cover letter", above
Check out our Cover letter only + work experience or Cover letter only + no work experience pages (choose the one that matches your level of work experience) for cover letter templates you can use to write this kind of cover letter.

Thursday, 2 March 2017

Secret Tips to Get Hired Fast Either Freelancer Or Office Job

There are some things that don't take a lot of time to do that can help you get hired quickly. I’ve heard from job seekers who simply didn’t know some of those things that will help them effectively job search.






One person I spoke to recently didn’t know you should send a thank you note after an interview. Another wasn’t aware that he didn’t need to include all of his many years of experience on his resume. Some of the things on the list are little things that make a difference. Others are significant enough that they can make or break your job search. Here are 15 things you should know about job hunting that will help you find a new job fast.

Review the list to see if there's anything that you're not doing and give it a try.

15 Secret Tips That Will Help You Get Hired Fast

1. You can save time job searching by using advanced search options on job boards. All the major job boards (like Indeed.com, SimplyHired.com, CareerBuilder, Monster, and Dice) have an “Advanced Search” option where you can search by keyword, location, a radius of a location, job title, company, type of job, date posted and other options. Here’s my list of the top 10 best job sites, and tips for using Advanced Job Search options. Sign up for our 30 Days to a New Job class to speed up your job search.

2. Applying for every job you find isn’t always a good idea. Focus your search on jobs that you’re qualified for. You’ll have a better chance of getting selected for an interview. Sending out random resumes and cover letters is just going to be a waste of time. Before you start job hunting, take the time to decide what type of job you’re seeking.


Even better, come up with a target list of companies you’d like to work for and do your best to get noticed by them. Here’s how to get noticed by your dream company.

3. Don’t stop applying for jobs while you are waiting to hear back from an employer. Most job seekers are rejected by over 15 employers before landing a job.  Learn from your mistakes, and keep applying until you get the right offer.  Worst case scenario, you will be juggling multiple job offers. That’s a good thing.

4. You need a specific cover letter or your resume may not get looked at. You only have a few seconds to impress a hiring manager enough to select you for an interview. I know hiring managers who screen every application personally and they tell me that if you don’t show what you can do for the company in the first paragraph of your cover letter, you're not going to get an interview. Here’s how to match your qualifications to a job, and tips for how to write a cover letter.

5. You should also target your resume to the job. It’s not just your cover letter. You resume should be edited and tweaked, so it’s as close a match to the job as possible.


Otherwise, it may not get picked up by the applicant tracking systems companies use to screen resumes or the recruiter who reviews it.  Here’s how to write a targeted resume.

6. You don’t need to include all your experience on your resume. Someone shared a resume with me that had over 40 years of work experience. Unfortunately, that’s not going to impress anyone. It dates him, and it’s too much information and too much experience for most job openings. Here are what experience and dates to include on a resume.

7. You can include more than full-time employment on your resume.

If you’ve been out of work you don’t want your resume to look like you have done nothing since you were laid-off. There are other things besides your employment history you can use to bolster your resume. Here’s a list of what to include on your resume when you have been out of the workforce.

8. Dress like a manager or a successful person in your profession. Maybe appearances shouldn’t matter so much, but they do. The first few minutes of an interview are when you get to make that critical first impression. Be sure that you’re dressed appropriately for the type of job and company you’re applying to. Here’s appropriate interview attire for a variety of different jobs and work environments.

9. Be Yourself. Susan Heathfield, Human Resources expert, says that you need to be yourself. Rehearsed answers, fake smiles, and saying what you think the interview wants to hear instead of what you actually believe, mislead the employer. Employers want to know who they hired, and that’s the person they expect to show up for the first day of work.

10. Storytelling during a job interview is an excellent way to share your experience and skills. One way to show the employer what you’re actually like is to tell a story. When you’re asked questions during a job interview, relay the specific skills and experience you have, as well as how you handled the situations you’re asked about. The more concrete information you provide, the more the hiring manager will know how qualified you are. Here’s how to answer interview questions.

11. Never say anything bad about a previous employer. When I was a hiring manager, I used to cringe when people badmouthed their boss. In fact, one of the most common interview mistakes is badmouthing your boss or co-workers. The first thing the interviewer is going to think about is what you will say about their company when you’re moving on.

12. You should send a thank-you note after a job interview. It’s important to follow-up after a job interview. It’s a way to show your appreciation for being considered for the job. It’s also a way to reiterate your interest and share anything you neglected during the interview. Here’s how to say thank you for a job interview, along with sample thank you notes and email message.

13. Networking is an essential component of successful job hunting. Most jobs are still found by networking, whether it’s online or in-person. You never know who can help you find your next job unless you tell your connections that you’re job seeking.  Here’s how to utilize your contacts at a company.

14. References can make a big difference in getting hired. References are important, and employers check them. Get recommendations from bosses, co-workers, clients, subordinates, and suppliers. Store them on sites like LinkedIn and share them whenever possible.  If you are worried about getting a lousy reference from your supervisor, work on getting some personal references you can add to your credentials. Here’s what to do about bad references.

15. It’s acceptable to apply for the same job more than once. So, you applied for your dream job, and you didn’t hear anything back from the company. Then you see the job posted again. A “do over” is fine, but be sure that you carefully match your qualifications to the job requirements in your resumes and cover letters. Also, check LinkedIn to see who you know. You might be able to get a referral the second time around. Here’s how to find contacts at a company.

Bonus Tip

Polish your shoes prior to your interview. This one’s an extra, but, yes, hiring managers do look at your shoes. If you don’t have shoe polish, a leather or multipurpose cleaning wipe will work. It’s important to look your best from head to toe!

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Water Fun Business: Kayaking on water using a kayak via Madras Fun Tools

Kayaks have been described as “those smart little, tight little, slight little, light little, thin little, slim little crafts”. The sight of a kayaker going through a rapid will definitely make its Eskimo inventor (who designed such a vessel for hunting seals) turn in his icy grave! Alternately known as paddling, kayaking involves travelling on water using a kayak, a narrow boat manoeuvred by a double-blade paddle. A kayak somewhat resembles a fishing boat, and usually comes fitted with a covered deck. There are two forms of kayaking – whitewater kayaking, where the paddler negotiates rapids and waterfalls, and ocean kayaking, where the kayak is piloted in open water or on a lake. Whitewater kayaking requires a great degree of skill (and is a lot more exciting than rafting, to boot).To most people, kayaking is a life changing experience or at the very least an adrenaline-charged adventure. It's been said that kayaking is one of the few adventure sports out there that truly is for everyone because its not about strength, it's about technique. In the years we've spent Kayaking, we have become South India's first family of river-based adventure, operating on over twenty rivers in India via Madras Fun Tools.


Kayaks are available in solo or tandem (for one or more persons), and are famed for their manoeuvrability, accessibility, adaptability and versatility; there is no waterway that these splendid “little” boats cannot negotiate. Kayaking, truly, is a delight, a more laid- back activity than rafting.

Though kayaking has slowly gained popularity among the adventure community, it is still an activity that’s outside the mainstream in India. It remains a limited recreational activity, a niche rather than competitive sport. Nevertheless, kayaking is more popular around the southern metropolis of Bangalore, particularly on the weekends; there are trips organized on the Kali (in Dandeli town), Kaveri and Narmada rivers. For the views, little beats a kayaking trip in Goa – along the coast, on the river (Mandovi, Zuari) or in the backwaters. The tranquil backwaters of Kerala are also a lure for the kayaking enthusiast.

Kayaks look like small fishing boat and are fast picking up as one of the favorite water sports in India. A Kayak can accommodate one or more people. For all those of you who are interested in taking on this water sport, there are lots of interesting destinations in India. Let us have a closer look at some of the best! In the north, the rivers in the Himalayan region were made for kayaking. There are trips in and around Rishikesh, on the Ganges, but also on the Alaknanda, Mandakini and Yamuna rivers. Further up, in bone-chilling and inhospitable Zanskar, summer expeditions are organized amid stunning scenery, on the Zanskar and Indus rivers, as well as on the Tsarap Chu (a tributary of the Zanskar). Also recommended is a kayaking expedition out east to Arunachal Pradesh, on the mighty Brahmaputra, or on the Subansari (a tributary of the Brahmaputra), and on the Rangit and Teesta rivers in Sikkim (make Darjeeling your base for a kayaking trip on the Teesta). Meanwhile, if you’re interested in sea kayaking, head to the coast of Kerala and Tamilnadu.

For those who simply love sporty waters, try surfing and scuba diving too. The thrill of conquering unstable waves is unparalleled after all! But remember, it’s good to be prepared for any disaster waiting to occur. So ensure you are well versed in all the measures that need to be taken on how to survive a sinking ship, brush up your swimming skills and then simply go ahead and get wet in the surfs of rapids.

If you needs more information then contact Madras Fun Tools